A National Historic LandmarkThe Richardson HotelAuthentic. Grand. Timeless.

A new dawn has arrived in Buffalo. Its light eases minds, uplifts community, and opens a space for thoughtful gathering. This National Historic Landmark — in the heart of Buffalo and near SUNY — boldly whispers an unexpected design, meshing time to its liking. Set on more than 40 park acres, this urban destination stands for those who embrace the human spirit and its stories. It invites reflection, originality, heritage, and organic social connections. Resilience and passion are within — and all around.

Enter the modern renaissance — The Richardson Hotel Buffalo.

A Gathering PlaceMeetings, Events, and Weddings

Come together in style and substance in the bold venues, bright spaces, and tranquil grounds of The Richardson Hotel. We welcome corporate retreats, weddings, and social occasions — even full property buyout events.

Learn More

Special OffersFind Your Savings

Special packages and offers are available to suit your stay at The Richardson Hotel. Check back often to get our best rates when you book direct.

View Deals

Explore Our Area

BUFFALO, NEW YORK

Explore Now

A PLACE TO REST

Find your quiet place of rest — where comfort and convenience merge in an understated elegance. Surround yourself in light-filled spaces, custom furnishings, soft cotton bed linens, and premium bath products.

LEARN MORE

Food and DrinkA Place to Dine

Chef-inspired Buffalo fare is yours at our signature restaurant inside The Richardson Hotel. Enjoy a cocktail, beer, or wine in our lounge and fresh-brewed premium coffees, pastries, and lite bites in our Café.

Image Slide1 Link to Larger Image Restaurant

Frederick Law OlmstedA philosophy of design

“Service must precede art.” Frederick Law Olmsted devoted himself to landscape architecture in 1865 with a focus on serving human needs. Honoring “Dame Nature’s unconscious influence,” he designs her natural spaces, horticulture, rocks, and water elements — even bridges — to create cohesive visuals that calm the mind. His method of contrasting dark foreground forms with lighter, less defined ones in the distance is displayed in New York’s Central Park, Biltmore Estate in NC, and Franklin Park in Boston among many others.

Image Slide1 Link to Larger Image Campus